Argentina Adopts Bill to Ban “Violent” Esports

Article 4 of the new proposal: “Games in the first-person shooter genre, where the player sees the world from the character’s perspective are not considered esports"

Dec 30, 2018
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It was inevitable that the meteoric rise of esports would draw the attention of governments and regulators for better or worse. Earlier this year we discussed the Argentinian esports community’s fight for official recognition, and it appears they’re winning, albeit with some tremendous caveats. Earlier this year, The Argentinian Esports Association  (AADE in Spanish) submitted a draft of a law that would control esports competitions in Argentina. 


Criticisms of this strategy were quick, with critics pointing to the exclusion of games in the first-person shooter genre, which includes Call of Duty, PlayerUnknown´s Battlegrounds, Halo, and Counter-Strike to name just a few popular esport titles.They have vibrant competitive scenes that include thousands of players across South America.


The controversy started when deputies introduced articles 3 and 4 into the original project:


Article 3 states: “This law rejects violent video games and everything that shows images of fury, aggression or cruelty […] Games belonging to the following genres: real-time strategy, digital collectible cards, and sports are considered esports those.”


Article 4 states: “Games in the first-person shooter genre, where the player sees the world from the character’s perspective are not considered esports.”


Regarding this new bill, the Argentinian Association of Esports and Video Games (DEVA in Spanish), an organisation with a similar purpose, wrote: “The AADE does not have any backing from players, teams or esports event organizers […] We are of the belief that a bill that impacts on the individual rights of the people involved in the esports scene as constituted in Argentina today necessarily requires a debate by all involved.”


Since the bill’s public unveiling, many different individuals and organisations have voiced their opposition, but the resolution is yet to come. There is even a complaint hashtag #NoAlProyectoDeEsportsAADE, meaning #notoAADEEsportsbill in English.


The ADDE responded by saying: “ Our doors have been always opened and it will continue to be open to everybody. We are really sorry to hear some of you don´t feel represented by us yet or even tried to tarnish the image of the institution that we built along these years”.